ASME EA-2

ASME EA-2

Energy Assessment for Pumping Systems

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Standard Details


Scope:
This Standard covers pumping systems, which are defi ned as one or more pumps and those interacting or interrelating elements that together accomplish the desired work of moving a fl uid. A pumping system thus generally includes pump(s), driver, drives, distribution piping, valves, sealing systems, controls, instrumentation, and end-use equipment such as heat exchangers. This Standard addresses open and closed-loop pumping systems typically used in industry, and is also applicable to other applications.

This Standard sets the requirements for conducting and reporting the results of a pumping system assessment (hereafter referenced as an "assessment") that considers the entire pumping system, from energy inputs to the work performed as the result of these inputs. An assessment complying with this Standard need not address each individual system component or subsystem within an industrial facility with equal weight; however, it must be suffi ciently comprehensive to identify the major effi ciency improvement opportunities for improving the overall energy performance of the system. This Standard is designed to be applied primarily at industrial facilities, but many of the concepts can be used in other facilities such as institutional, commercial, and water and wastewater facilities.

Assessments involve collecting and analyzing system design, operation, energy use, and performance data, and identifying energy performance improvement opportunities for system optimization. An assessment may also include other information, such as recommendations for improving resource utilization, reducing per unit production cost, reducing life-cycle costs, and improving environmental performance related to the assessed system(s). Assessment activities may include, but are not limited to, engaging facility personnel and providing information about the assessment process; collecting and analyzing data on system design, operation, energy use, and performance; identifying energy performance improvement opportunities; and making recommendations for system improvement and implementation in a written report. This report should document system design; quantify energy consumption and performance data; document the assessment process; show results, recommendations and savings projections; and improve facility personnel's understanding of system energy use and operation.

All system assessments start with identifying the ultimate goal of the system. When the ultimate goal of the system has been established, the assessment continues to investigate how well-suited the existing system is to deliver the needed output from the perspective of both component selection and energy effi ciency. See Fig. 1. An assessment thus encompasses more than just looking at input and output of energy.

This Standard sets requirements for: organizing and conducting a pumping system assessment; analyzing the data from the assessment; and reporting and documentation of assessment findings. When contracting for assessment services, plant personnel may use the Standard to define and communicate their desired scope of assessment activity to third party contractors or consultants.

This Standard differentiates between and has requirements for three levels of assessments:

(a) Level 1 (prescreening) assessment is a qualitative investigation that is intended to determine the magnitude of energy optimization potential and therefore determine the necessity for a Level 2 or Level 3 assessment. The Level 1 assessment is used to identify specifi c systems for further analysis. A Level 1 study may be performed prior to beginning the Level 2 or Level 3 study. Alternately, a Level 1 assessment may be performed in concert with the Level 2 or 3 assessments. In this case, if a given pumping system does not pass the prescreening criteria indicating a Level 2 or Level 3 assessment is required, the assessment process for that pumping system is considered complete.

(b) Level 2 assessment is a quantitative (measurementbased) investigation meant to determine the energy savings potential for at least one operating condition. This assessment is performed using data taken from the plant information systems or by using portable measuring devices. The measurements usually cover a limited amount of time, thus giving a snapshot of the operating conditions at the time of measurement. In systems with little or no variability, a Level 2 assessment shall be used to determine the savings potential.

(c) Level 3 assessment is also a quantitative investigation, requiring measurements taken over an extended period of time suffi cient to develop a system load profi le. This activity is usually associated with more extensive use of in-situ monitoring to ensure that the operating conditions can be accurately determined at the various duty points. The data analysis is also more complex.

All pumping system assessments should start with a Level 1 assessment. During this prescreening, the pumping systems that will undergo further investigation are identifi ed and selected. The outcome of the prescreening process shall be the selection of the best candidates, typically those with signifi cant energy savings potential, for more in depth analysis (Level 2 or Level 3 assessment). The assessment team shall determine which systems require a Level 2 or Level 3 assessment based on the criteria presented in section 5. An overview of the decision making process for each of the levels are provided in Fig. 2 (see para. 5.2).

Organization: ASME International
Document Number: asme ea-2
Publish Date: 2009-01-01
Page Count: 28
Change Type: REAF
Available Languages: EN
DOD Adopted: NO
ANSI Approved: YES
Most Recent Revision: YES
Current Version: YES
Status: Active

Publication Date: 01/01/2009 - Complete Document Changes Incorporated

Description :

This Standard covers pumping systems, which are defi ned as one or more pumps and those interacting or interrelating elements that together accomplish the desired work of moving a fl uid. A pumping system thus generally includes pump(s), driver, drives, distribution piping, valves, sealing systems, controls, instrumentation, and end-use equipment such as heat exchangers. This Standard addresses open and closed-loop pumping systems typically used in industry, and is also applicable to other applications.

This Standard sets the requirements for conducting and reporting the results of a pumping system assessment (hereafter referenced as an "assessment") that considers the entire pumping system, from energy inputs to the work performed as the result of these inputs. An assessment complying with this Standard need not address each individual system component or subsystem within an industrial facility with equal weight; however, it must be suffi ciently comprehensive to identify the major effi ciency improvement opportunities for improving the overall energy performance of the system. This Standard is designed to be applied primarily at industrial facilities, but many of the concepts can be used in other facilities such as institutional, commercial, and water and wastewater facilities.

Assessments involve collecting and analyzing system design, operation, energy use, and performance data, and identifying energy performance improvement opportunities for system optimization. An assessment may also include other information, such as recommendations for improving resource utilization, reducing per unit production cost, reducing life-cycle costs, and improving environmental performance related to the assessed system(s). Assessment activities may include, but are not limited to, engaging facility personnel and providing information about the assessment process; collecting and analyzing data on system design, operation, energy use, and performance; identifying energy performance improvement opportunities; and making recommendations for system improvement and implementation in a written report. This report should document system design; quantify energy consumption and performance data; document the assessment process; show results, recommendations and savings projections; and improve facility personnel's understanding of system energy use and operation.

All system assessments start with identifying the ultimate goal of the system. When the ultimate goal of the system has been established, the assessment continues to investigate how well-suited the existing system is to deliver the needed output from the perspective of both component selection and energy effi ciency. See Fig. 1. An assessment thus encompasses more than just looking at input and output of energy.

This Standard sets requirements for: organizing and conducting a pumping system assessment; analyzing the data from the assessment; and reporting and documentation of assessment findings. When contracting for assessment services, plant personnel may use the Standard to define and communicate their desired scope of assessment activity to third party contractors or consultants.

This Standard differentiates between and has requirements for three levels of assessments:

(a) Level 1 (prescreening) assessment is a qualitative investigation that is intended to determine the magnitude of energy optimization potential and therefore determine the necessity for a Level 2 or Level 3 assessment. The Level 1 assessment is used to identify specifi c systems for further analysis. A Level 1 study may be performed prior to beginning the Level 2 or Level 3 study. Alternately, a Level 1 assessment may be performed in concert with the Level 2 or 3 assessments. In this case, if a given pumping system does not pass the prescreening criteria indicating a Level 2 or Level 3 assessment is required, the assessment process for that pumping system is considered complete.

(b) Level 2 assessment is a quantitative (measurementbased) investigation meant to determine the energy savings potential for at least one operating condition. This assessment is performed using data taken from the plant information systems or by using portable measuring devices. The measurements usually cover a limited amount of time, thus giving a snapshot of the operating conditions at the time of measurement. In systems with little or no variability, a Level 2 assessment shall be used to determine the savings potential.

(c) Level 3 assessment is also a quantitative investigation, requiring measurements taken over an extended period of time suffi cient to develop a system load profi le. This activity is usually associated with more extensive use of in-situ monitoring to ensure that the operating conditions can be accurately determined at the various duty points. The data analysis is also more complex.

All pumping system assessments should start with a Level 1 assessment. During this prescreening, the pumping systems that will undergo further investigation are identifi ed and selected. The outcome of the prescreening process shall be the selection of the best candidates, typically those with signifi cant energy savings potential, for more in depth analysis (Level 2 or Level 3 assessment). The assessment team shall determine which systems require a Level 2 or Level 3 assessment based on the criteria presented in section 5. An overview of the decision making process for each of the levels are provided in Fig. 2 (see para. 5.2).

Document Type : Complete Document

Language : English

Page Count : 28

Publication Date : 01/01/2009

Revision : 09

Status : Current

Supplement : W/

Title : Energy Assessment for Pumping Systems

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